Why are Transitions Difficult for People with ADD and ADHD?

Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

As the title suggests, this piece is dedicated to the difficulties us individuals with ADD and ADHD face when dealing with transitions. Whether it is a student transitioning schools or an adult transitioning careers, any type of move in one’s routine can be extremely difficult.

So why is this the case? Well the obvious answer is change. And while it isn’t a wrong answer, there’s a bit more to the story.  Let’s explore this a little deeper.

Stating it simply, ADD/ADHD is a disorder of regulation. Getting our bodies and minds adjusted to certain situations is a process. I remember when I was a child and we owned a tropical fish tank. Whenever we would get a new fish, it was important to acclimate the fish to its new environment. We’d leave the fish in the bag until the temperature of the water in the bag was the same as the water in the tank.

Now let’s compare this scenario to someone with ADD/ADHD. Personally speaking, whenever I enter a new environment it takes me a bit of time to get my body comfortable. From being comfortable with the temperature (yes like my fish) to adjusting to the lighting, it is a process. That is why I try to get places early so I can regulate as well as possible.

Now let’s explore this to the bigger transitions in life. Getting one’s self acclimated to a new school, job or residence requires an adjustment period. The problem is in this day and age, it’s very difficult to make a gradual adjustment. We’re expected to move and move quickly. With this being the case, here are some suggestions to help with transitions.

  1. Get to places early. For students transitioning to college, try to get on campus as early as possible for better acclimation.

  2. Be a student of yourself. Learn the things that help/hinder you and identify potential concerns.

  3. If something isn’t going well, do not be your own worst critic. Learn from these challenges.

Getting yourself in the right state of mind and comfortable will help with the transition process.

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit www.carrolleducationalgroup.com & www.iepexperts.com. I can be found on Twitter at ADHDGuru. You can also find me on Facebook, Google Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 877.398.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Real World Consequences for Adults with ADD and ADHD

Please listen to my latest Podcast visit with my good friend Tara McGillicuddy on Real World Consequences for Adults with ADD and ADHD by following this link. It is a huge issue for folks with ADD/ADHD and one that we often struggle to understand living in our day-to-day lives. Just because we have ADD/ADHD doesn’t mean the rest of the world knows or understands it.

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit www.carrolleducationalgroup.com & www.iepexperts.com. I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on Facebook, Google Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 877.398.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Females with ADD and ADHD

Please enjoy my video on females with ADD and ADHD. Around 25% of diagnosed cases of ADD/ADHD are female. Why is this the case? And how do we help females recognize and address ADD/ADHD? Primarily it has to do with how ADD/ADHD manifests itself in males compared to females, but as we learn more details, we’re able to help more females address concerns. I look forward to your feedback and questions!

 

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit  www.carrolleducationalgroup.com www.iepexperts.com.  I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on FacebookGoogle Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 877.398.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Creating Filters for ADD and ADHD

People with ADD and ADHD have a difficult time creating and using filters. Examples of this include saying or doing the wrong thing at the wrong time or giving way too much information. Recognizing this concern is a huge first step in decreasing self-sabotaging behaviors. The more you learn about creating and implementing filters, the more you can address this concern. Please enjoy my video and I look forward to your feedback and questions!

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit  www.carrolleducationalgroup.com www.iepexperts.com.  I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on FacebookGoogle Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 877.398.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Does Mindfulness Help with ADD and ADHD?

Image courtesy of by Stuart Miles] at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of by Stuart Miles] at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

When identifying the best way to cope with the effects of ADD and ADHD, we’re presented with many different options. From medication to therapy, our choices can seem endless. I am often asked if there’s a method I prefer, and my answer always remains the same…

if it works for you, then stick with it!

More specifically, don’t be afraid to try new things or combine treatments. Managing one’s ADD/ADHD isn’t a one size fits all approach, but one that requires us to identify a routine for success.

In recent times, the concept of mindfulness has been introduced to the ADD/ADHD world. What is mindfulness? According to www.meriram-webster.com,

the practice of maintaining a nonjudgmental state of heightened or complete awareness of one’s thoughts, emotions, or experiences on a moment-to-moment basis; also:  such a state of awareness.

So what exactly does this mean? How do we exactly incorporate this into our daily lives?

In the simplest form, the concept of mindfulness is actually an ages’ old concept with strong Buddhist roots. Through the practice of meditation, one can get to a better and clearer state of mind. By relaxing and focusing on the present, we can remain more cognizant on the present and the current task(s) at hand. Identifying better ways of coping with stressors and dealing with the past are also a part of this process.

OK all of this sounds great in theory, but can us ADD/ADHD folks actually incorporate this into our lives? As I like to say, when we try to improve functioning, it isn’t as easy as just changing. Seeing personal and professional growth isn’t easy work. We have to dedicate ourselves to becoming better people. Just like when we go to the gym, results aren’t overnight. Incorporating mindfulness into our daily routine requires dedication; expecting immediate and easy results aren’t reasonable to the process. The best practice is to chart your progress from the beginning and follow the results throughout your experiences.

While there’s no easy way to quantify the results of mindfulness; I can tell you that using effective meditation practices certainly can’t hurt. If you’d like to explore this option, I would recommend seeking options like Transcendental Meditation as a starting point. If you have any feedback, please contact me with the details. I’ll be happy to share this with others seeking information.

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit  www.carrolleducationalgroup.com www.iepexperts.com.  I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on FacebookGoogle Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 877.398.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Priorities and Money for Adults with ADD and ADHD

I want to thank my good friend Tara McGillicuddy for asking me back to ADHD Support Talk Radio 

Image courtesy of sscreations at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of sscreations at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

discussing ADD and ADHD and its impact on priorities and money for adults.

To listen, please (click here).

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit  www.carrolleducationalgroup.com www.iepexperts.com.  I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on FacebookGoogle Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 877.398.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Concussions with ADD and ADHD

Image courtesy of stock images at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of stock images at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Concussions has been very prevalent through some high-profile cases related to sports. But the effects of head injuries and its impacts has been better understood in the mental health community. In individuals with ADD and ADHD, it will exaggerate the effects it has on the individual.

In a recent conversation with a female adult (she played hockey in college) became concussed her senior year during her last game. At first, she just thought she only hit her head. But as the effects started to set in, she was unable to function due to issues of concentration, focus and light sensitivity. Sound like ADD/ADHD? Well it certainly shadows some of the conditions. Considering she also has ADHD, it magnified her conditions.

As someone that has participated and coached sports, I STRONGLY suggest that any blows to the head are treated with the utmost urgency. As the young lady above suggested, she felt no immediate impacts of her head trauma and her symptoms became exaggerated days after the incident. Seek immediate attention and closely monitor the situation.

Interventions for concussions are similar to those that are suggested for individuals with ADD/ADHD. Keeping this in mind, the potential for exaggerated impacts cannot be ignored on us ADD/ADHD folk. If it’s your child, staying the course of treatment and increasing the intervention is a place to start. I’ve coached children and adults who have suffered head injuries and the involvement of a team approach is essential. A regular and intense treatment plan is key. The individual involve needs to stick with the program. Think of it as, in many cases, retraining the brain. Or think of it another way; if, for instance, you injure your leg and require surgery. You need to reteach your leg how to properly function. The same goes for individuals that are concussed. Relearning how to properly function and retain information requires retraining and reinforcement.

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit  www.carrolleducationalgroup.com www.iepexperts.com.  I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on FacebookGoogle Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 773.888.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Friendships and Social Challenges for Individuals with ADD and ADHD

Friendships, Social Challenges and Adult ADD / ADHDI want to thank my good friend Tara McGillicuddy for asking me back to ADHD Support Talk Radio this week discussing ADD and ADHD and its impact on friendships and social challenges.

Please enjoy (Click Here)!!!

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit  www.carrolleducationalgroup.com www.iepexperts.com.  I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on FacebookGoogle Plus and Tumblr. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 773.888.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.

Conversations and Communication with Adult ADD and ADHD

Please enjoy my latest visit with Tara McGillicuddy about conversations and communication.Image courtesy of ddpavumba / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

Being Gifted with ADD and ADHD

ADD, ADHD, Gifted, Jonathan Carroll, ADD Coaching, ADHD Coaching

Image courtesy of graur razvan ionut / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

One of my most interesting are the individuals that are gifted with ADD and ADHD. Clients that are off-the-charts in ability and not achieving the types of successes he or she is capable of causes concerns on many different levels including family, friends, co-workers, teachers and most-importantly the individual.

Usually my introduction to gifted clients is always the same. It starts something like, “(Insert name here) isn’t living up to his/her potential and is struggling in (job/school/life)”. Let’s start with the word potential. It’s a word that really drives me nuts. Everyone has potential, but it is how we maximize our abilities. That is usually where I start with most clients. When I hear the word potential, I usually ask what exactly is the individual potentially trying to do. Recalibrating one’s expectations and understanding is the place to start.

Just because we’re extremely talented doesn’t mean that always translates to immediate success. Being gifted isn’t a guarantee that one will be perfect, but it certainly gives one some serious advantages. Throwing ADD/ADHD into this conversation also can add layers of complications. But there are ways that the two together can have some amazing synergy. It really starts with taking a brutally honest self-inventory and identifying where we are successful and potential areas for improvement. Understanding how both of these impact the individual in positive (and not-so-positive ways) is the key to improvement.

I do need to stress that the only way to determine one has ADD/ADHD and/or gifted is to have a full neuropsychological evaluation. As I like to say, just because it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck doesn’t mean it’s a duck. You should know exactly what you’re dealing with before seeking treatment. As much as I would like to say that everyone is gifted, it is a word that is often used WAY too often. There’s a difference between being talented and being gifted. Only an evaluation can shed some more light on the situation. I do also want to differentiate the difference between cognitively and physically gifted. The neurological evaluation does apply to individuals in both of these categories because you need a better picture of the individual.

For more information on my ADD, ADHD and Executive Functioning coaching, please visit www.adhdefcoach.com. In addition to working with clients in-person, I also work with clients all over the United States and World online, please visit www.onlineadhdcoach.com for more information. To learn more about my other services, please visit  www.carrolleducationalgroup.com www.iepexperts.com.  I can be found on Twitter at ADHDEFCoach. You can also find me on FacebookGoogle Plus and Tumblr. My good friend and fellow ADD/ADHD Coach Tara McGillicuddy invites me as a regular guest on ADD/ADHD Support Talk Radio. Feel free to email me at jonathan@adhdefcoach.com or call 773.888.ADHD (2343) with any additional questions.